Slash Chords



What are slash chords?

* Here's my definition of a slash chord:
Giving you an alternative bass note, we say A over E, for example. The chord looks like this: A/E So, play A in the r.h. and E in the l.h.

* Here's an online definition of slash chords at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash_chord

"In popular music a slash chord or slashed chord is a chord whose bass note or inversion is indicated by the addition of a slash and the letter of the bass after the root note letter"...

* Piano Chord Symbols: Slash Chords by Duane Shinn
Great video showing you what slash chords are all about



* Use Slash Chords, Diminished Sound in Gospel Music
Play:

C/ C E G
B/ B E G#
A/ C E A
F#/ A D F#
G/ B D G

* LGM Definition of Slash Chord
A slash chord is nothing more than a chord with an alternate bass note.
They're also called compound chords.

When you see a chord like A/E, the first character is the chord and the second character after the slash is the bass note, so A/E would be an A chord with an E bass note instead of an A bass note.

Some of the most common types of slash chords are inversion based, meaning that one of the notes already in the chord triad are used for the bass note.
G/B, D/F#, A/C#, A/E...all are inversions of the chord but using either the 3rd note of the 5th note as the bass note instead of the root note.

Some slash chords are non-inversion based, like B/E. The B triad is B, D#, F#...there's no E there BUT if you add extensions to the triad to make, say, a BMaj9/E, then you've got B, D# and F# as well as C# and E so BMaj9/E becomes inversion based.

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,51740.0


So, C/G means play G chord with your left hand and a C chord with your right.

* Chord Charts At LGM

Slash chord chart #1:

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,55476.0.html



Slash chord chart #2:

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,55491.0.html


Slash chord chart #3
:

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,55694.0.html



http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,55603.0.html


slash chords


http://www.ibreathemusic.com/cat/3


http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,52634.0.html




* Duane has an Ebook on Power Chords

http://www.ebookexplorer.com/book_1971.html


* FOUR PART CHORDS OVER ROOT - Chord Voicings

REMEMBER: for these chords you'll want to play a 4-note chord in your RH over your root in the LH. Also you can invert that chord in your RH to any inversion you'd like unless otherwise noted.

Em7 / C = Cmaj9 spelled out.. C/EGBD
note: another way to think about this one is to play a minor 7th chord off of the 3rd in your RH and the root in your LH

Ebmaj7 / C = Cm9 spelled out.. C/EbGBbD
note: another way to think about this one is to play a major 7th chord off the minor 3rd in your RH and the root in your LH

Bm7b5 / G = G9 spelled out.. G/BDFA
note: another way to think about this one is to play a minor 7 flat 5 chord off the 3rd in your RH and the root in your LH

Fmaj7b5 / G = G13 spelled out.. G/FABE
note: another way to think about this one is to play a major 7 flat 5 chord off the flat 7 in your RH and the root in your LH
note: only root and 2nd inversion should be used on the chord in the RH

Dm7 / G = G9sus4 or G11 <-- this is a HOT chord that I use all the time I substitute the 3 chord in a 3-6-2 progression for this sus chord (I'll post this later)
note: another way to think about this one is to play a minor 7th chord off the 5th in your RH and the root in your LH
note: spelled out.. G/DFAC

Fmaj7 / G = G13sus4 <-- Another HOT chord I use a lot too. I substitute the 5 chord in a 2-5-1 progression for this sus chord
note: another way to think about this one is to play a major 7th chord off the flat 7 in your RH and the root in your LH
note: spelled out.. G/FACE

Fm7b5 / G = G7 (b9 #5)
note: another way to think about this one is to play a minor 7 flat 5 chord off the flat 7 in your RH and the root in your LH
note: spelled out.. G/FAbBEb

Bmaj7b5 / G = G7 (#9 #5)
note: another way to think about this one is to play a major 7 flat 5 chord off the 3rd in your RH and the root in your LH
note: only root position should be used on the chord in the RH
note: spelled out.. G/BD#FA# or G/BEbFBb (the first way is the best way to look at it b/c you can see that the 9 and 5 are sharped)

Fmaj7#5 / G = G13 (#11)
note: another way to think about this one is to play a major 7 sharp 5 chord off the flat 7 in your RH and the root in your LH
note: only root position should be used on the chord in the RH
note: spelled out.. G/FAC#E

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,55491.0.html


* Final Note

I have found that most people who chord songs in the LH/RH format do so because they play by ear. Many folks want to read sheet music and read chord symbols. It's great to have the chords written out for voicing purposes. Using chord symbols for posting chords is easier, but many want chords written out so that they can understand. Learning alternative bass notes will add so much more to your playing. When I first started playing the piano and soloing, I used sheet music. When I came aboard worship teams and gained experience playing with a bass player, I learned to read chord charts and gladly welcomed slash chords, so as not to step on the bass players toes! lol

All the best,

~ LadyD





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