Chord Fingering


* Piano Chords- Major Triads

Piano chords are formed by combining two or more scale tones (notes). You now know the notes that comprise all 12 major scales and you can play these scales smoothly. Apply this knowledge and begin combining the scale tones to form chords. You are now combining two or more intervals. The simplest and most common type of piano chords is the triad.

Here's detailed finger settings for hundreds of piano chords and scales, displayed in a graphical manner.


http://www.looknohands.com/chordhouse/piano/


A triad is composed of 3 notes from the major scale. A major triad consists of the 1st, 3rd, and 5th tones (notes) of a major scale. This is referred to as the root (1st), major third (3rd), and perfect fifth (5th). So, based upon this, C major chords would consist of the notes C, E, and G of the C major scale. The symbols for a major triad are Major, M, or Maj. Whenever you see these names or symbols following a piano note (C, D, Eb, F#, etc.) you know it is referring to major triad chords. Or if you are just given the note (C, D, etc.) it is inferred to be a major triad.

When you practice these major chords, I recommend you form them using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th fingers of your right hand. Thumb (1st), middle finger (3rd), and pinky (5th). Your left hand will form these chords using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th fingers also, but the numbering is pinky (5th) middle finger (3rd) and thumb (1st).

* Piano Chords-Minor Triads

You now know that combining the 1st, 3rd, and 5th tones (notes) of a major scale form major triad piano chords. If you lower the 3rd tone one half step it becomes a minor triad. So, minor triad chords are the 1st, b3rd, and 5th tones (notes) of a major scale. The b3rd is the symbol for "flatted 3rd". This means the 3rd tone (note) of the major scale is lowered one half step. You will also see this referred to as root (1st), minor third (b3rd), and perfect fifth (5th).

So, based upon this a C minor chord would consist of the notes C, Eb, and G. The symbols for a minor triad are minor, m, min. or -. Whenever you see these names or symbols following a piano note (C, D, Eb, F#, etc.) you know it is referring to minor triad chords.

Now, when you practice these minor chords, form them using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th fingers of your right hand. Thumb (1st), middle finger (3rd), and pinky (5th). Your left hand will form these chords using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th fingers also, but the numbering is pinky (5th) middle finger (3rd) and thumb (1st).

* Piano Chords-Other Triad chords


Two other 3 tone (note) piano chords are the augmented and suspended 4th. An augmented chord is formed by combining the 1st, 3rd, and #5th tones (notes) of a major scale. #5th (sharped 5th) means you raise the 5th tone (note) of the scale by one half step. Based upon this combination of tones, C augmented chords would consist of C, E, and G#. The symbols for an augmented chord are aug., (#5), and +5. Whenever you see these names or symbols following a piano note (C, D, Eb, F#, etc.) you know it is referring to augmented piano chords.

A suspended 4th chord is formed by combining the 1st, 4th, and 5th tones (notes) of a major scale. Based upon this combination of tones a C suspended 4th piano chord would consist of C, F, and G. The symbol for a suspended 4th chord is (sus4). Whenever you see this name or symbol following a piano note (C, D, Eb, F#, etc.) you know it is referring to suspended 4th piano chords.

* Fun with Finger and Chord Practice- Ezra Bufford



Chord fingering will become like second nature as you play chords in its root and inversions. Letting your fingers walk to the next chord, passing the note of the scale, will make the music flow. Sometimes the chord is not played on all 3 fingers with right and left hand. You can hit a C on your left and E G on your right to make a broken chord. Mix and match for variation. Of course let your ear judge which tone is good/better/best. Practice your scales, inversions, arpeggios, and of course your chords. Practice with the best and correct fingering from the beginning so you don't have to "unlearn" things later own. Get it right "slowly" from the start and then you will be able to fly faster later on.

* Audio Chords Series- Learn Chords from Hear and Play

Learn Chords

* Step By Step you'll learn:

How to form various types of chords: major, minor, diminished, augmented and the easy theory behind them. DO NOT BE INTIMIDATED. You'll literally laugh when you discover how easy it is to play all of these chords by ear!



* The classes of chords and the difference between triads, sevenths, ninths, elevenths, and thirteenths... all broken down in "normal," down-to-earth, language.



* One magic formula that creates all the chords you'll ever need to know. It involves two words: Quality & Quantity (and you need both in order to create all chords).



* How to form any major scale in seconds using my "Why Won't He Wear White When Hot" trick. You won't find this taught anywhere else because it's totally out-of-the-box. These are the tricks students need to bring theoretical, intimidating concepts down to earth... and to stop from boring themselves to death! The courses are full of these creative tricks!



* Easy ways to understand intervals (which are merely distances between notes). There are melodic intervals and harmonic intervals and you'll learn both. Simply put, if you can understand freeway signs: "Next exit in 3 miles"... then you can understand intervals!



* The secret behind the "number system" and how to use it to learn practically any chord out there with 7 practical examples.


http://www.LadyDpiano.com
Post a Comment
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

© copyright 2008-2017 – All rights reserved

LadyD Piano
Related Posts with Thumbnails