Chord Progression


I found a great learning tool for musicians on-line.
You can download a FREE chord progression chart, keyboard scales chart and poster by Wayne Chase!

http://www.completechords.com/Downloads.html



Wayne Chase goes on to say in his book How Music Really Works, "Chord progressions, though not absolutely necessary in the making of music, serve three main functions:



1. Chord progressions help define tonality and unify a piece of music. They provide a sonic frame of reference that makes unrest and dissonance possible.



2. Chord progressions impart drive and propulsion to a piece of music. In the context of tonality, most chords, like most intervals in a melody, sound, to a greater or lesser degree, tense and restless. They seek resolution. Like the tune itself, they’re also trying to find their way home.



3. Chord progressions furnish music with the qualitative aural equivalents of color and depth." Read more about how chord progressions work and download more free chapters!

http://www.howmusicreallyworks.com


" Secrets of Exciting Chords & Chord Progressions!"
Here you can learn FREE piano lessons on piano chords and chord progressions.

http://www.playpiano.com/images/II-V7-I%20Chord%20Progression.htm


Looking for answers to harmonic progressions? You'll find them here:

http://www.answers.com/topic/chord-progression


To put in other words, let's talk about chord progressions. This is what I know...

BASIC PROGRESSIONS

A progression is simply a group of 2 or more chords. Each chord you play leads, or progresses, to the next chord. The ultimate goal is to get back to the 1 chord of the key you are in. Progressions get their name from the bass / left hand notes you play. This is based off the circle of 4ths, which is the circle of 5ths in reverse. Here are the progressions that are used the most in gospel music. I'll put them in the key of C:

First, the members of C:
C=1 D=2 E=3 F=4 G=5 A=6 B=7


1-5-1

This progression is usually found at the end of a song. As you are playing this, once you play the 5, you should feel a strong urge to play the 1.:

C / C-E-G (1) C / C-E-G (1) C / E-G-C (1) C / G-C-E (1)
G / G-B-D (5) G / B-D-G (5) G / D-G-B (5) G / G-B-D (5)
(repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat)


1-V7-1 progression

This is just a little variation of the 1-5-1 progression. By adding in the minor 7th, it creates an even stronger urge to go to 1. Now, you don't add the 7th of the key you are in, you add the 7th of the chord. The correct term for the V7 chord is the dominant 7th chord:

C / C-E-G (1) C / C-E-G (1) C / E-G-C (1)
G / G-B-D-F (5) G / B-D-F-G (5) G / D-F-G-B (5)
(repeat) (repeat) (repeat)

C / G-C-E (1) C / G-C-E (1)
G / F-G-B-D (5) G / G-B-D-F (5)
(repeat) (repeat)


1-4-1 progression

This progression is also called the "Amen" progression:

C / C-E-G (1) C / C-E-G (1) C / E-G-C (1) C / G-C-E (1)
F / F-A-C (4) F / C-F-A (4) F / F-A-C (4) F / A-C-F (4)
(repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat)


1-4-5-1 progression

This is the most basic progression that can be used to play a whole song. A lot of the hymns follow this progression:

C / C-E-G (1) C / C-E-G (1) C / E-G-C (1) C / G-C-E (1)
F / F-A-C (4) F / C-F-A (4) F / F-A-C (4) F / A-C-F (4)
G / G-B-D (5) G / B-D-G (5) G / D-G-B (5) G / G-B-D (5)
(repeat) (repeat) (repeat) (repeat)


1-4-V7-1 progression

This is a variation of the 1-4-5-1 progression. Instead of playing a regular 5 chord, you can play a V7 chord:

C / C-E-G (1) C / C-E-G (1) C / E-G-C (1)
F / F-A-C (4) F / C-F-A (4) F / F-A-C (4)
G / G-B-D-F (5) G / B-D-F-G (5) G / D-F-G-B (5)
(repeat) (repeat) (repeat)

C / G-C-E (1) C / G-C-E (1)
F / A-C-F (4) F / A-C-F (4)
G / G-B-D-F (5) G / F-G-B-D (5)
(repeat) (repeat)


Dominant 7th chord to 4

Whenever you have any kind of major chord, you can add the minor 7th of that chord. Once you do that, it becomes a dominant 7th chord. It naturally wants to go to the 4 chord. Key does not matter here:

C / C-E-G-Bb C / C-E-G-Bb C / E-G-Bb-C
F / F-A-C (4 of C) F / C-F-A (4 of C) F / F-A-C (4 of C)
(repeat) (repeat) (repeat)

C / G-Bb-C-E C / Bb-C-E-G
F / A-C-F (4 of C) F / A-C-F (4 of C)
(repeat) (repeat)



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