How To Play A Love Song: Chuck Girard


How To Play A Love Song


 I remember fondly when Chuck Girard, Tommy Coomes, Jay Truax and Fred Field first stepped out onto the Calvary Chapel stage back in 1970. I blogged about Chuck Girard's song, Freedom.

One of my favorite songs by Chuck Girard and Jesse Johnston is A Love Song. Copyright 1972 by Dunamis Music. It's played in the Key of G with a moderate waltz tempo.

Here are the piano chords to A Love Song.

Gmaj7   Dm/G      C        Cm
Lend an ear to a love song
        G
Ooh, a love song
        Bm               Cmaj7 Am7 Dsus4 D7 Gmaj7
Let it take you, let it start
              Dm/G      C         Cm
What can you hear in a love song?
            G
If you can feel it
              Bm              Cmaj7 D7 G
Then you're feeling from the heart
F#m                                             Emaj7
All the emotions true feelings of life is what music of love is about
Em7                         A7                         D   Gmaj7
If you are listening with peace in your heart and no doubt
           Dm/G     C        Cm
So listen now to a love song
           G
If you can hear it
         Bm        Cmaj7 D7 G
We will never be apart


If you're not familiar with some of the chords, here's what they look like.

Gmaj7 = G/DF#C
Dm (G bass) = G/FAD
C = C/EGC
Cm = C/GCEb
G = G/DGB
Bm = B/F#BD
Cmaj7 = C/EGB
Am7 = A/CEA
Dsus = DG/CEA
D7 = D/DF#A
F#m F#/AC#F#
Emaj7 = E/G#BF#
Em7 = E/GBDE
A7 = A/C#EA
D = D/DF#A

Here's the beautiful song on YouTube. Hope you enjoy playing along.



Chuck Girard
Take It Easy
 The Stand

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"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

Refernce Cadences

LadyDpiano: Cadence Reference
English: Plagal cadence EspaƱol: Cadencia plagal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



 A cadence is a chord progression which marks a close or conclusion at the ends of phrases, sections, or at the end of the entire piece. Cadence is a Latin word which means "to fall." cadences mark the "falls" (points of rest) in music.

Practice these cadences, first hands separately, then together. Play in all keys.

Plagal Cadence I  IV  I


C  F   C
I   IV  I

CEG/CEG
CFA/CFA
CEG/CEG (rest)

Second Position

EGC/EGC
FAC/FAC
EGC/EGC (rest)


GCE/GCE
ACF/ACF
GCE/GCE (rest)

Authentic Cadence I  V  I

First Position

C  G  C
I   V   I 

CEG/CEG
BDG/BDG
CEG/CEG (rest)

Second Position

EGC/EGC
DGB/DGB
EGC/EGC (rest)

Third Position

GCE/GCE
GBD/GBD
GCE/GCE (rest)

Complete Cadence In Three Positions  I  IV  I  V  I


 First Position C Major
              
C  F   C  G  C
I    IV I   V  I

CEG/CEG
CFA/CFA
CEG/CEG
BDG/BDG
CEG/CEG  (rest)

Second Position

EGC/EGC
FAC/FAC
EGC/EGC
DGB/DGB
EGC/EGC  (rest)

Third Position

GCE/GCE
ACF/ACF
GCE/GCE
GBD/GBD
GCE/GCE (rest)

First Position A Minor

Am  Dm  Am  E  Am
i       iv      i      V   i  

ACE/ACE
ADF/ADF
ACE/ACE
G#BE/G#BE
ACE/ACE  (rest)

CEA/CEA
DFA/DFA
CEA/CEA
BEG#/BEG#
CEA/CEA (rest)

EAC/EAC
FAD/FAD
EAC/EAC
EG#B/EG#B
EAC/EAC (rest)    

For those who want to learn more...

Cadences occur at the end of a phrase, or the end of part of a phrase. They are  the melodic or harmonic ending of a phrase, section, movement or complete composition. In other words, it’s a chord progression that feels like a conclusion. You play a combination of chords to close a musical phrase and rest with a sense of resolution.

There are many types of cadences to study in music theory. I know of several common cadences. Here are four of them.

1. Authentic Cadence consists of the V or V7 chord followed by a I chord. An example of what to play looks like these notes that you can play in both hands:

V = AC#E
I = DF#A
V6 = C#EA
I = DF#A
V7 = AC#EG
I = DF#A
V65 = C#EGA
I = DF#A

2. Half Cadence (V7) creates an expectation that something is coming next because the dominant chord is not resolved. A Half Cadence is a cadence that ends with a V or V7 chord. It is also called imperfect cadence. An example of this progression could be played here.

I = DF#A
V = AC#E
IV64 = DGB
ii6 = GBE
V7 = AC#EG
V of V = EG#B
V = AC#E

3. Plagal Cadence (IV - I) is familiar to the ear.  You probably have heard it when singing amen at the end of a hymn played in church. A Plagal Cadence consists of a IV chord followed by a I chord. Many musicians refer to it as the church cadence or amen cadence. It's the very first cadence I learned at the piano. An example would be:

IV = GBD
I = DF#A
IV64 = DGB
I = DF#A

4. Deceptive Cadence (V7) is very unpredictable. It consists of a V (or sometimes IV) chord followed by a vi chord. The most common are:

V7 – vim (classical and pop)
V7 – iiim (jazz and pop)
V7 – im (when key is major)
V7 – I (when key is minor)
V7 – IV (gospel, pop, etc.)
V7 – bVI (various pop, classical, etc)

There are more cadences to know.

Full Cadence (V7 – I) Tones moving from tension and arriving at resolution with the ending chord playing in root position. Also known as Authentic Cadence.
Imperfect Cadence begins with ii, vi or IV. It starts like the sound of a question and resolves to the V chord.
Perfect Cadence moves from the V chord - I chord. Practice them and remember, all cadences end with the I or V chord and are made of two chords.


 Hear and Play offers Advanced Gospel Courses, Gospel Core Essentials and Gospel Music Training Center

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Practice four cadence patterns to be familiar with them!

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"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

Learn To Play 10, 000 Reasons

Matt Redman: 10,000 Reasons
Jesus Culture Long beach

 Over the summer I attended Jesus Culture in Long Beach, California. The huge hall quickly filled up with young people and the worship band began to play this beautiful song by Matt Redman.


Westin Hotel in Long Beach, California

We stayed at a beautiful place called the Westin Hotel. The facilities were grand and we walked a short distance to the conference. I hope you get the chance to hear this particular song in corporate worship. Perhaps you've played it on the worship team. If you're not familiar with the melody, here it is on YouTube.







Chord Chart to 10,000 Reasons (Bless The Lord)
http://www.praisechords.net

10,000 Reasons, a praise and worship song, was written by
Matt Redman and Jonas Myrin © 2011 Thankyou Music

Chorus:
C          G
Bless the Lord, O my soul,
D/F# Em
O my soul,
C             G    Dsus4 D
Worship His holy name.
C        Em
Sing like never before,
C D  Em
0 my soul.
C              D        C/G G C/G G 
I'll worship Your holy name.


C         G           D       Em
The sun comes up, it's a new day dawning;
C            G            D     Em
It's time to sing Your song again.
C            G              D           Em
Whatever may pass, and whatever lies before me,
C2         G                Dsus4 D  G   Gsus4 G >> Chorus
Let me be singing when the even- ing comes.


C       G                D        Em
You're rich in love, and You're slow to anger.
C       G               D         Em
Your name is great, and Your heart is kind.
C        G                D       Em
For all Your goodness, I will keep on singing;
C2           G              Dsus4 D  G    Gsus4 G to chorus
Ten thousand reasons for my heart to find. 
 C       G           D            Em
And on that day when my strength is failing,
C         G            D         Em
The end draws near, and my time has come;
C        G                   D        Em
Still my soul will sing Your praise unending:
C2           G                 Dsus4  D  G  Gsus4 G to Chorus
Ten thousand years and then fore - - vermore!

Coda:
Em   C            D      Em
I'll worship Your holy name.
C            D       G
Yes, I'll worship Your holy name.
 
It's a real easy song to play. For a C chord, I use this 
inversion (G-C-E) and for a G chord, play (D-G-B) 

Free Pdf Download: 10, 000 Reasons (Bless The Lord)
http://www.mattredman.com/chordcharts  

Musician Transformation 44-page Free Download 

All the best,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

Thirteen Years Later


9/11 Memorial

 Thirteen Years Later


 For quite some time now, I have put my thoughts into a post for my blog on 9/11. You can read them here,  Ten Years Later and 911 Ten Years Later

While driving around on a beautiful day like today, I couldn't help but notice all the flags flying half mast. I was sad for a little while for all the victims and then I remembered some of my friends who are pilots now, particularly Tommy Mc Guinness the son of Tom Mc Guiness who was the co-pilot on that tragic day. We need pilots and especially for such crazy times as we are seeing today with so much unrest in the world. Thank you to all military for serving our country.

Many of you have heard my story of me being the keyboard player at Tom Mc Guiness' West Coast Memorial Service. I simply was handed a score of music and played the keys on a string patch.  Thirteen years ago I saw Tom's son (a wee little lad back then) sitting in the front row at my church listening to his mom talk about what had happened the morning of 9/11. Today, Tom is a pilot and I am his friend on FaceBook. I am so very proud of him. I'm sure his dad is, too.

Destiny is defined as:

The events that will necessarily happen to a particular person or thing in the future.
The hidden power believed to control what will happen in the future; fate.

I don't have all the answers to many deep and troubling things but my Pastor encourages me in the word by sharing Romans 8:28 Somehow... all these things are working together for my good. I will continue to trust the Lord.

I have no songs or chord progressions to share with you today. Just a heart that is appreciative for my readers and fellow church musicians. So, keep practicing whatever it is that your passionate about. Whether patriotic, gospel, blues or classical... move your fingers daily and find your rhythm to life.

We have so much freedom in our country. Jesus is my savior. Do you know Him?

Next week I hope to be writing about syncopated rhythms, riffs, app reviews and ear training.
What are you working on?

Take care and God Bless!



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"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

Altering Chords

Dominant seventh flat five chord on C
English: Dominant seventh flat five chord on C (Photo credit: Wikipedia)




 I have learned a great deal of information from Jermaine Grigg's, especially the section on altered chords from his course, The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear 

Introduction to Altering Chords

"Any chord, whether major, minor, augmented or seventh, can be modified or 'altered' thereby changing its character or color. In particular, with the dominant seventh which is mainly characterized by three notes: the root, major third and minor seventh; the fifth, ninth eleventh and thirteenth may be altered.

Raising or lowering the notes of a chord and its extensions by a half step may change its dissonance. This increases the 'tension' of the chord and increases the sense of release as one moves to a less dissonant chord (the tonic). Care must be taken that these altered chords are correctly numbered."

Example: C9 (+11) represents a C ninth chord with the root, a major 3rd, a perfect 5th, a flattened 7th, a major ninth and a sharpened 11th.


DbEbGbAbBbDbEbGbAbBb
CDEFGABCDEFGABC

Example: C#9 (#11) represents a C# ninth chord with the root, a major 3rd, a perfect 5th, a flattened 7th, a major ninth and a sharpened 11th.


DbEbGbAbBbDbEbGbAbBb
CDEFGABCDEFGABC

 Example: C7 (b9b5) represents a C seventh chord with the root, major 3rd, diminished 5th, minor 7th and minor 9th.


DbEbGbAbBbDbEbGbAbBb
CDEFGABCDEFGABC

The main purpose of altering chords is to increase the effectiveness in a progression. In previous lessons, we've already learned how a dominant seventh is more effective than a dominant triad in "2-5-1" and other chord progressions.

I recommend to my friends, The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear
The book goes on to explain using altered chords in the 2-5-1 progression, in the 3-6-2-5-1 progression and the 7-3-6-2-5-1. 

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"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King


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