How To Play Mandolin Rain

Bruce Hornsby performing on a Steinway concert...
Bruce Hornsby performing on a Steinway concert grand piano. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



Intro
AmGEmD     (3 Times)
C 
     G              
The song came and went
          D             Am     Em
Like the times that we spent
        C           D               C
Hiding out from the rain under the carnival tent
   G              
I laughed and she smiled
          D            Am     Em
It would last for a while
           C             D                    C
You don't know what you got till you lose it all again


Chorus
              Am        G
Listen to the mandolin rain
              Em            D
Listen to the music on the lake
             Am                G        Em    D
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
              Am      G
Listen to the banjo wind
       Em            D
A sad song drifting low
              C     G                        C         G
Listen to the tears roll down my face as she turns to go


A cool evening dance
Listening to the bluegrass band takes the chill
From the air till they play the last song
I'll do my time
Keeping you off my mind
But there's moments that I find, I'm not feeling too strong

(Chorus)

Bridge

F                      C
Running on down by the lakeshore
        D                   G     
She did love the sound of a summer storm
F                         C
Playin on the lake like a mandolin
         D             G          D
Now it's washing her away once again

(Chorus)

The boat's steaming in
I watch the sidewheel spin and
I think about her when I hear the whistle blow
I can't change my mind
I knew all the time that she'd go
But that's a choice I made long ago

(Chorus)

THE END Ultimate Guitar.com
 


GD
The song came and went
AmC
Like the times that we spent
GDG
Hiding out from the rain under the carnival tent
GD
I laughed and she smiled
AmC
It would last for awhile
GDG
You don't know what you got till you lose it all again

(chorus)
G
Listen to the mandolin rain
DG
Listen to the music on the lake
AmGDG
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
G
Listen to the banjo wind
DG
A sad song drifting low
AmGDG
Listen to the tears roll down my face as she turns to go

(verse 2)
A cool evening dance
Listening to the bluegrass band takes the chill
From the air till they play the last song
I'll do my time
Keeping you off my mind
But there's moments that I find, I'm not feeling too strong

(chorus)
G
Listen to the mandolin rain
DG
Listen to the music on the lake
AmGDG
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
G
Listen to the banjo wind
DG
A sad song drifting low
AmGDG
Listen to the tears roll down my face as she turns to go

(bridge)
FC
Running on down by the lakeshore
DAmC
She did love the sound of a summer storm
FC
Playin on the lake like a mandolin
AmCD
Now it's washing her away once again

(chorus)
G
Listen to the mandolin rain
DG
Listen to the music on the lake
AmGDG
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
G
Listen to the banjo wind
DG
A sad song drifting low
AmGDG
Listen to the tears roll down my face as she turns to go

(verse 3)
The boat's steaming in
I watch the sidewheel spin and
I think about her when I hear the whistle blow
I can't change my mind
I knew all the time that she'd go
But that's a choice I made long ago

(chorus)
G
Listen to the mandolin rain
DG
Listen to the music on the lake
AmGDG
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
G
Listen to the banjo wind
DG
A sad song drifting low
AmGDG
Listen to the tears roll down my face as she turns to go
 http://www.chordie.com

Her's what I am playing:


G               Am   G/B
The song came and went
DAm
Like the times that we spent
G/B Cadd9D                   Csus2/E   G  D
Hiding out from the rain under the carnivaltent
G                AmG/B
I laughed and she smiled
DAm
It would last for awhile
 G/BCadd9D                      Csus2/E    G
You don't know what you got till you lose it all again

(chorus)
 D           Am7     G
Listen to the mandolin rain
              Em7                       D
Listen to the music on the lake
 GAm7          GD/ECsus2  G
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
 D                  Am7G
Listen to the  bango wind

Em7         D
A sad song drifting low
 GAm7G       G/F#Csus2G
Listen to the tears roll down my face as she turns to go

(verse 2)
A cool evening dance
Listening to the bluegrass band takes the chill
From the air till they play the last song
I'll do my time
Keeping you off my mind
But there's moments that I find, I'm not feeling too strong

(chorus)

(bridge)


F                           C/E
Running on down by the lakeshore


Gsus2/BC/EC  D

She did love the sound of a summer storm
FC/E


Playin on the lake like a mandolin


Gsus2/BC/EC  D




Now it's washing her away once again

(chorus)

Chord Breakdown:



G = G/DGB

Am = A/EAC

D = DF#A

G/B = B/DGB

Cadd9 = C/CDEB

Csus2/E = E/CDA

Em7 = E/EGBD

Am7 = A/EGC

D/E = E/F#AD

G/F# = F#/DGB

Gsus2/B = B/DGA

C/E = E/CEGB

F = F/ACF

D/F# = F#/DF#A






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I love Bruce Hornsby's style of playing. He sure can reach those octaves and then some.
Do you have a favorite song? I think my choice would be, That's Just The Way It Is.
You can see the chord progressions to the song, here.


 





"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Charlie Parker: My Little Suede Shoes


Photo Credit: Ivan in Nottingham, England



 Great Tutorial: My Little Suede Shoes-Charlie Parker

Charlie Parker: My Little Suede Shoes-mp3

The Real Easy Book-Vol. 3: A Short History Of Jazz from Sher Music Co. is a unique fake book which will give students 'the big picture' of all the different eras and styles of jazz. It consists of 5-10 tunes from each era or style-from Dixieland to Afro-Cuban jazz, and everything in between-plus a short story text introducing each era and its musical innovations (like the Bebop one printed above).
For more information, see The Real Easy Book, Vol.3: A SHort History Of Jazz

 
The Era

Bebop is so much a part of the jazz vocabulary today that it's hard to image why the music was so controversial when it was introduced in the mid-1940s. Most of the innovations in jazz seem a natural outgrowth of what had been played before, but bebop was nothing short of a revolution-both musically and culturally.

Swing era bands were big bands, with riff-based melodic tunes and limited time for soloing. The arrangement was as important as the tune, and there was relatively little room for harmonic experimentation, since the music was primarily for entertainment and dancing. The beboppers found this too confining and were seeking new avenues of artistic expression.

The architects of bebop were almost all African Americans who largely came out of the black big bands, meeting in clubs after hours to jam, and to explore new musical ideas. These were exciting times of big musical breakthrough! Bebop was played predominantly by small groups, with plenty of room for the innovative improvisor. Charlie Parker (known as "Bird") was one of the most gifted of all improvisors, and he became an icon to many in the jazz community. Dizzy Gillespie was the master theoretician and teacher, as well as a brilliant trumpeter. Thelonius Monk, who was the house pianist at a club in Harlem called Minton's, was another key figure, but his style is so unique that it really defies categorization. Bud Powell was the quintessential bebop pianist.

Bebop polarized the jazz community, with many 'traditional' players pitted against the so-called 'modernists.' To the old guard, bebop was not as melodic, the improvisations were harder to follow, and it was hard to dance to. But bop musicians felt that their music was an art form, and that their primary responsibility was to the music itself. History has proved them right, because bebop has been the foundation of jazz for the past half century, and many of the bebop pioneers became senior citizens enjoying worldwide acclaim.


The Musical Innovations

1. Composition- What made bebop sound so radical at the time? First, the melodic lines were quite different. Gone were the solos that stayed close to the melody that were so prevalent in the swing era. the swing era tunes often featured complex arrangements, but the bebop musicians largely did away with them, opting instead for extended improvisations based on the chord changes. The melody was stated at the beginning of the tune, but then it would be lost in the complex harmonic possibilities offered by the chord structures of the music.

Some bebop musicians would write whole new tunes based on the chord changes of standards, or pop tunes of the day. These contrafacts, as they are called, include Bird's "Donna Lee," based on the standard tune "Indiana," "Ornithology," based on "How High The Moon," and Thelonius Monk's "Evidence," based on "Just You, Just Me."

2. The Rhythm Section -  Some of the most radical innovations of the bebop era were rhythmic. The bebop drummer moved the time-keeping duties from the bass drum to the hi-hat and played in a more polyrhythmic style, with asymmetric accents that were called "bombs." The approach was developed by the two master bebop drummers, Kenny Clarke and Max Roach, and their new concepts have forever altered jazz drumming. The bass player became the main keeper of the quarter note pulse, with virtually all classic bebop tunes played in 4/4. The pianist's role gradually became one of pushing the soloist to new heights, in addition to outlining the chord progressions.

3. Harmonic Advances - Bob players liked to improvise on difficult chord progressions, at breakneck tempos, with bursts of eighth and sixteenth notes. They also altered existing chords, frequently utilizing the lowered, or flatted, fifth, and other more dissonant notes against the basic harmony. Bird was quoted as having said that he came up with bebop one night as he was playing a solo on the tune "Cherokee" and found himself using just the upper extensions(9ths, 11ths, and 13ths) of the original chord changes. The end result of all this stretching of previous limits was that the music sounded too abstract and jagged to some, but gorgeous and artistic to others.

Today, the advances of bebop are standard practice throughout the jazz world, but people still scratch their head in amazement when they hear Bird at the peak of his form, swirling out chorus after chorus of genius  improvising. -- Reprinted courtesy of Sher Music and Criterion Music.

 Anyone who is  a jazz lover and wants to deepen their understanding of chords, scales, licks, and soloing techniques, visit Jazz 201

Best Wishes,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Friday Freebie: Memorizing Music

Photo Credit: tcatcarson

Do you have an easy time playing the piano without looking at the notes? Some find it a bit challenging to play a song with no notes in front of them.

Here's a cool article I found online:

 Tips on how to memorise your piece

"Playing from memory could be essential while performing in concert, festival or competition or even in exam. Knowing your piece by heart demonstrates that the composition has been studied in depth.

There are few ways to memorize music:

How to begin? Listen recorded version of your piece first, so that you’ll have music in your ‘ear ‘already. Most of the people, not necessary musicians are able to remember songs and melodies quite easily by just listening it a couple of times. The same with pianists, they can memorize piece quite quickly by playing it through a few times. It is called aural memory, when musician knows how the music sounds in his head and when he is able to sing the piece through internally including dynamics and phrasing.The easiest way to memorize piece is repeat the same phrase over and over again, until its stays in your ear, then shift it to the succeeding phrase.Aural memory is one of the strongest and most reliable memory motivators.

The other step is to understand piece you are about to memorize intellectually. First pianist should know the main key and all upcoming modulating keys in the composition. Pupil should analyze the overall structure and know the cadential parts. Recognize repeating phrases and compare them with new material introduced in the piece. The whole process requires conscious control. This type of method is called intellectual or analytic memory.

The whole memorizing process requires lots of repetition, it involves constant finger action. Eventually fingers memorising patterns, this process is called kinaesthetic memory. Without aural and intellectual memory support finger memory wouldn’t be very reliable on its own.

The last method to memorise the music is visualy by remembering how the music looks on the page. 
All the four: aural, analytic, kinaesthetic and visual methods should be maintained and combined simultaneously for effective memorizing process."
http://www.maestrolist.com/article/tips-on-how-to-memorise-your-piece.html

Here's an article I wrote awhile back on the subject of memorizing. 

Ten Tips for Memorizing Music

Do you memorize sheet music by playing it over and over, hoping it will somehow stick in your brain after playing a song many times through? Sometimes this will work, especially if you are playing a short piece.

If you have ever experienced forgetting where you are at a lesson or recital, you might want to try these ten ideas to make memorizing easier for you.

1. Learn the song first before you begin to memorize it.

2. Use the proper fingering.

3. Practice slowly and steadily at first.

4. Watch your hands as you play.

5. Memorize your hands separately.

6. Memorize small sections, maybe one or two measures of music. Don't try to memorize the whole song in a day.

7. Divide the piece into sections and plan to learn some each day. Then review all the sections. Start anywhere and play through the A and B section of a song. Focus on the ending to the song, so with the knowing the last measure, you can end strong.

8. Analyze the music. Notice notes and sections that repeat. Pay attention to where the music changes. Memorize the dynamics and other markings in the song.

9. Practice mentally away from the piano, tapping your fingers on the table or visualizing the music in front of you.

10. Repetition.

Many teachers consider memorization one of the most important aspects of piano playing. Most books, which discuss the how-to of memorization, stress the importance of understanding the details of musical form. So, start an opening phrase of music and learn it without the music.

Then consider the physical demands the piece of music is making. Look for tricky fingering that comes up at a certain point. Play it many times over and over, remember the feeling. Are your hands playing together or separately? Are they moving in opposite directions? On which notes does the thumb go?

Each time you hit a blind spot, you need to refer to the printed music. Remember that when you hit your first blank moment, open your music book and find the place in the music you couldn't remember. Play through it a few times. Now you've begun to deepen your understanding of the song.

Most importantly, every now and then play the song you memorized because some memorization is only short-term. The advantages to following these points are many. By memorizing, the music is unfolding in a new way.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6674413

More Resources:

From Robert T. Kelley, Tips On How To Memorize Music

From Kathy Ferneau, Memorization Techniques

From Ziegler and Ostromencki,  Piano Education Page

Looking for piano exercises to increase your speed? Visit, Hanon 1 - Finger Exercises

Have a wonderful weekend!


Best,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

How To Play: If We Are the Body

Photo Credit: Cory Morse

In 2003 Mark Hall wrote a moderately fast song called, If We Are The Body. I like it!

If We Are The Body

(Capo 2)

G   G Gmaj7 G Gmaj7 (x4)    {Gmaj7 are hammered on and off}

       Em7                Csus2
It's crowded in worship today
            A7Sus4   Asus4          Csus2          Dsus4/F#
As she slips in           trying to fade into the faces
    Em7                       Csus2             
The girls teasing laughter is carrying 
                   A7Sus4 Asus4
Farther than they know
                  Csus2   Dsus4/F#
Farther than they know, Lord


(Chorus)
       G
But if we are the body
               Dsus4/F#
Why aren't His arms     reaching?
                Em7
Why aren't His hands healing?
               Csus2  
Why aren't His words teaching?
       G
And if we are the body
               Dsus4/F#
Why aren't His feet       going?
            Em7             Dsus4/F#             Csus2
Why is His love not showing them       there is a way?


           Em7 {4 measures}
There is a way.



   Em7                      Csus2
A traveler is far away from home
         A7Sus4   Asus4               
He sheds his coat         
             Csus2          Dsus4/F#
And quietly sinks into the back row
     Em7                       Csus2               
The weight of their judgmental glances
                A7Sus4 Asus4                
Tells him that his chances     
                      Csus2  Dsus4/F#
are better out on the road


(Chorus)

(Bridge)
Dsus4/F#              Em7      A7Sus4    Csus2     
Jesus            paid much too high    a price
                                     Dsus4/F#
For us to pick and choose who should come
               Em7  A7Sus4       Csus2
And we are the bo - - -dy of     Christ


(Chorus) x2

             Em7 {3 measures}
Jesus is the way 
 


I like to play this song in the Key of A.


Verse 1

     F#m7                 Dsus2
It's crowded in worship today
           B7SUS   B7     Dsus2         Esus E
As she slips in trying to fade into the faces
    F#m7                      Dsus2                      B7SUS   B7
The girls teasing laughter is carrying farther than they know
                  Dsus2    Esus E
Farther than they know


Chorus
       A
But if we are the body
               Esus E
Why aren't His arms reaching?
       E5      F#m11
Why aren't His hands healing?
               D
Why aren't His words teaching?
       A
And if we are the body
               Esus E
Why aren't His feet going?
 Esus   E5  F#m11           E       D(add2) 
Why is His love not showing them there is a way?
           F#m
There is a way




Chorus
       A
But if we are the body
               Esus E
Why aren't His arms reaching?
               F#m
Why aren't His hands healing?
               D
Why aren't His words teaching?
       A
And if we are the body
               Esus
Why aren't His feet going?
  E5         F#m11               E               D(add2)
Why is His love not showing them there is a way?


Bridge
E          F#m       E       Dsus2
Jesus paid much too high a price
                                     E
For us to pick and choose who should come
               F#m E     Ddud2
And we are the body of Christ

Chorus
       A
But if we are the body
               Esus  E
Why aren't His arms reaching?
 Esus E5              F#m11
Why aren't His hands healing?
               D
Why aren't His words teaching?
       A
And if we are the body
               Esus E
Why aren't His feet going?
   E5        F#m11          E               D(add2)
Why is His love not showing them there is a way?
 F#m7
Jesus is the way
 
Chord Breakdown 
 
F#m7 = F#C#/EA
 
B7sus = BF#A/EA
 
B7 = BF#A/D#F#
 
Dsus2 = DA/EB
 
Esus = BEA/EAC#
 
E = E/EG#B
 
A = A/EAC# 
 
E5 = E/EABE
 
F#m11 = F#/EABE
 
D = D/EF#AC#
 
 You may be interested in GospelKeys Urban Pro 600
 





"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

Blues Monday: How To Play Clarinet Blues

Photo Credit: ronnieb

 Martha Mier wrote Clarinet Blues; soulfully with slow blues swing.


The bass runs are pretty much AE, played together, then single notes F, Gb, F.

The right hand run starts on G#, A, C, D, Eb, D, C, A. Then you'll hear a
descending run with single notes; A, Ab, G, E, Eb, D, C, C, A.

The triplet in the right hand is C#, D, F that is played 3 times.

That cool ending chord is AE/CGB.

Syncopation

Ragtime is the music most commonly thought of when you talk about syncopation. Another way to put it is "ragged rhythm". I am finding that pop music is filled with syncopation quite a bit also. An oldie song "The Best Is Yet To Come" by Mr. Coleman has many syncopated beats and you can feel the syncopation, especially if you know the song just by saying the words, Out of the tree of life, I just picked me a plum.

There seems to be two problems musicians face when confronted with this kind of syncopated pattern. The first is how to read the rhythm patterns correctly. Perhaps you can use this tip to help you if you find playing syncopated notes is somewhat challenging. First you need to change each of the oddly placed quarter notes to two eighth notes and then turn them into tied notes. Now you can count the rhythm.

So before we had eighth note, quarter note, eighth note, quarter note, eighth note, tied eighth note in one measure. Now we can count easily, 1 &, 2 &, 3, 4 & because we have three sets of eighth notes and one quarter note. The second problem is in playing the melody with a real rhythmic feel. To make this happen, place accents on the notes that occur on the normally weak beats. Any music dictionary will tell you to shift the accent of a note or chord to a weak beat or the weak part of a beat.

Back to our original song, the accent would would look like this:

Out of the tree of life, I just picked me a plum. Anticipating and feeling the beat are common words applied to Cuban music. These irregular patterns are so very necessary to play in your piano practice no matter what genre of playing. So, spice up your playing with more syncopation!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3624661

This is a great tool to have as a musician, Song Robot Software

Happy Blues Monday!





"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King

Friday Freebie: Ear Training

Photo Credit: Easy Ear Training

You'll find free Tutorials, Quizzes and Discussion Forums to help you with ear training,
plus a free 68 page eBook at http://www.easyeartraining.com/


Ear training is a skill that improves with daily practice. That's why I admire the folks at
HearandPlay.com because they are masters at playing by ear, especially Jermaine Griggs.

This wonderful site, Easy Training, offers a free pack of interval training tracks at Intervals with these free tracks. "The downloadable pack includes 5 MP3 files, each of which is about 3 minutes long. Each focuses on a different interval."

Photo Credit: Blob Chorus Music Education App
A delightful app that I discovered at http://musicianswithapps.com provides
great ear training for children and adults, too. Listen to the Blob and then match the tone with
King Blob. It's free!

Here's an article I wrote awhile back on ear training.

Ear training is especially important if you want to improvise, compose, or figure out melodies and chords to songs by ear. A good musical ear is an acquired skill, not a gift. And like other skills, it is acquired through practice.
The more we train our ear to recognize this connection, the more we enjoy playing music, because we learn to understand what we play.

Here are a few questions I am often asked.

Who needs ear training?
All musicians need to train their ear in order to know what they are playing and to anticipate what they are about to play!

Why do ear training?
Because understanding the sounds we hear will be necessary to:
* Jam with other musicians
* Compose music
* Sing in tune

There are 3 qualities that every good jazz musician must possess:
* a great ear
* a strong sense of time
* a unique sound.

While there are many different ways to approach these skills, the first two always require a certain amount of drilling. The ear can be thought of as a muscle and to a certain degree must be trained like one. Improved ears will lead to better intonation, improvisation, ensemble playing and transcription skills. With that in mind, here are three great ways of dramatically improving your students' ears and, hopefully, their overall playing.

Associating a familiar melody with each interval is a quick way to learn an interval's distinct sound. For example, a melodic interval can be ascending or descending. Either way, it's still the same interval. Now, you don't want to get confused with interval inversions because a minor third will is still a minor third no matter which note comes first.

Intervals can be classified as consonant or dissonant. I can tell you that it's much easier to hear the consonance or dissonance of harmonic intervals than melodic ones.

Here's a list showing you the relative stability (consonance) or instability (dissonance) of the octaves up to an octave.

Consonant: Perfect, unison, m3, P4, P5, m6, P octave.

Dissonant: m2, M2, +4. (o5), m7, M7.

Another gentle approach is to describe Hollow Sounds, like austere and earthy, Indian drones and Scottish bagpipes or heavy metal rhythm-guitar.

Hallow: Perfect unison, P4, P5, P octave. This would be perfect intervals and their inversions.)

Sweet: m3, M3, m6, M6. (thirds and sixths)

Now there are active and passive methods for ear training. A passive drill would be to play two notes in succession and listen to that interval. Sometimes you will be asked to name the next note.

Harmonic intervals can be drilled the same way. These types of drills can be done with chords or chord progressions.

Are you familiar with the underlying scales and moveable "Do" solfege?
It's essential that you learn to sing a chromatic scale. As chromaticism is prevalent throughout modern jazz, this exercise will improve both intonation and students' understanding of the genre. When singing through the chromatic scale, remember to use sharps when ascending and flats when descending.

Chromatic Scale Ascending:
C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C
Do, Di, Re, Ri, Mi, Fa, Fi, Sol, Si, La, U, Ti, Do

Chromatic Scale Descending
C, B, Bb, A, Ab, G, Gb, F, E, Eb, D, Db, C
Do, Ti, Te, La, Le, Sol, Se, Fa, Mi, Me, Re, Ra, Do

Target Tones
Target tones are an essential part of any ear training regimen. They force students to hear not only chord tones, but surrounding tones as well. Now, many students can correctly sing a major scale but they have some difficulty picking out specific intervals at random.
With respect to the scales and scale degrees, the best way to practice this is through the use of target tones. Here are a few exercises:
C, // C, D, C // E, D, C // F, E, D // C, G, A // B, C, A // B, C, B // C
Ear training leads to better intonation, improvisation, band playing and transcription skills overall.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6462345

If you're looking for more digital ear training software, visit Pitch.






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Learn To Play Amazing: Matt Redman

Photo Credit: penywise


 One of the Matt Redman song's that's simple to play is called Amazing. I made a video from my webcam but need to work on the angle view. Plus, I forgot the tag part to the song and made a mistake or two!  lol Be gentle with me, since this is my first video recording from my laptop. When school is out, I'll work on more music at the keyboard and see how it all works out with the recording.



Here's the chord chart:

Amazing

VERSE 1:
D/F#      G
A love so undeserved,
  D/A
a gift that's free,
    G/B          D/F#
You lavish on me
          G
A peace I could not earn,
    D/A           G/B           D/F#
and mercy for the freedom of my soul

CHORUS 1:
D                    G               D/A  G/B
That's what's so amazing about Your grace
D                    G               D/A
That's what's so amazing about Your grace

VERSE 2:
D/F#         G
Forgiveness runs so deep
  D/A                 G/B
Within Your heart of loving kindness
D/F#          G
And should a soul forget
    D/A              G/B             D/F#
The cross of Christ reminds us every day

CHORUS 2:
D                    G               D/A  G/B
That's what's so amazing about Your grace
D                    G               D/A
That's what's so amazing about Your grace
      D/F#
Lord, everyday
    G
You pour on me
     D/A           G/B
Your blessings of eternity,
    D                    G             D/A  G
and that's what's so amazing about Your grace

BRIDGE:
D/F#                         G
Freely I've received, now freely to give
D/A                         G/B
Freely I've received, now freely to give
D/F#                         G
Freely I've received, now freely to give
D/A                  G/B
give my life to You


I wanted to share the notes I'm playing in the video with you.

D/F# = F#/AD

G = G/BDA

D/A = A/DF#A

G/B = B/GDF#

F#/AD

G = G/BDA

D/A = A/DF#A

G/B = B/GDF#

D/F# = F#/ADF#

G/GDF#

D/A = G/ADF#

G/B = B/GDF#

D = D/DF#A

G = G/GBE

D/A = A/F#AD

G/B = B/GDG

D = D/DF#A

G = G/GBE

D/A = A/F#AD

G/B = B/GDG

F#/F#AE

G = GBE

D/A = A/F#AE

G/B = B/GBE

D = F#/DF#A

G = G/GBE

D/A = A/F#AD

G = G/DGB

* Repeat Part*

* D/F# = F#/AD

G = G/GB

Asus = A/GCD

D/F# = F#/AD

Asus = G/GDG *

Tag:

D/F# = F#/DAD

G = G/GD

D/A = A/F#AD

G/B = B/GD

D/F# = F#/DAD

G = G/GD

D/A = A/F#A

G/B = B/DG

Another cool song by the artist Matt Redman you might want to learn,  Heart-of-Worship

If you're interested in learning to play Gospel songs by ear, visit Gospel Keys.

Best Wishes,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Friday Freebie: Homemade Muscial Instruments

Photo Credit: Hot Black

Daria provides a video of a song from Africa, Here Come Our Mothers

Thank you for the times you listened
Thank you for the times you heard
You made me feel like I could soar
And sing just like a bird...thanks to you

Now I can stand tall
And I can stand true
You know it is
Thanks to you! 


Happy Mother's Day to all!

Photo Credit: Tip Junkie
 

I got to thinking about drums from Africa and reflecting on some of my own handmade
music instruments I made for the kindergarten class.

Music Mouse

Safari Shakers


I wanted to share a list with you
of other cool bloggers who have enjoyed creating sounds from cool resources.

Homemade Bongo Drums

Washboards and Rattles

Homemade Musical Instruments

Rainsticks and Tambourines

Homemade Guitars and Harps

Banjo and Xylophone

Making Music-Martha Stewart

Musical Shaker Eggs


"The rhythm section is the foundation for good improv experiences." 
-- John Kuzmich, Jr.

Here's a more complex blues riff.

L.H.  Chord  - R.H. Single Notes

C7 - C, C, Bb, C

F7 - F, F, Eb, F

G7 - G, G, F, G

C7 - C, C, Bb, C, Eb

F7 - F, F, Eb, F, A

G7 - G, G, F, G, Bb

C7 - C, C, Bb, G, Bb, C

F7 - F, F, Eb, C, Eb, F

G7 - G, G, B, D

C7 - C, E, G, C, Bb

F7 - F, A, C, F, Eb

G7 - G, B, D, G, F

Improve Your Piano Playing
Access Free Piano Tutorials Here

Blessings,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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How to Play: All You Need Is Love



I have always been a fan of The Beatles. I join multitudes of folks in celebrating this
enormous wave of popularity in the songwriting team of Lennon and McCartney. The
Beatles music is timeless. Awhile back, I blogged about a song Let It Be. You might want
to check it out.

So, I got to thinking about special needs children and how they have Special Olympics
for them. It's wonderful to cheer folks on to victory. Everyone needs love... that's what I think. Another song that comes to mind, All You need Is Love, is a good one. Do you remember it?

The song has some bass walk ups and walk downs. A walk down involves starting on the
 first chord, then playing a transitional chord, and then arriving at the destination chord. When
 I play this particular Beatle song in my l.h., I'm playing G, F# then E. Sometimes the walk will
be these single notes, A, G, to F#. Other times, listen and you'll hear a longer walk down, like A,
G, F#, E, D, C.


The guitar chord chart goes something like this:

G                                    D/F#                 Em
There's nothing you can do that can't be done

G                                   D/F#                    Em 
Theres nothing you can sing that can't be sung

D7/A                   G                      D/F#                    
Nothing you can say but you can learn to
               D7/A
play the game

D7/A      D7
It's          easy


There's nothing you can make that can't be made
No one  you can save that can't be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It's easy


CHORUS:

G          A7       D7
All you need is love

G          A7       D7
All you need is love

G          B7       Em         G/D 
All you need is love        love

C             D7      G
Love is all you need


There's nothing you can know that isn't known
Nothing you can see that isn't shown
Nowhere you can be that isn't where you're meant to be
Its easy

CHORUS

C           D7      G
Love is all you need   

G          A7       D7
All you need is love

D7                         G          A7       D7
All together now   All you need is love

D7                        G          A7       D7
Everybody now   All you need is love 

G      D     G  
Love is all you need   (repeats a few times)

I'm playing these chords:

L.H./R.H.


G/BG                                    F#/DA    E/BE
There's nothing you can do that can't be done

G/BD                    F#/ADA             E/BE
Theres nothing you can sing that can't be sung

A/CDF#          G/BDA            F#/CD                    
Nothing you can say but you can learn to
            E/CDF#A
play the game

D7/A      D7
It's          easy


There's nothing you can make that can't be made
No one  you can save that can't be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It's easy


CHORUS:

G/DGB    A/EGAD    D/F#AD
All you need is love

G/GBD    A/EGAD    D/F#AD
All you need is love

G/DGBD   B/F#AD#   E/GB        D/DG 
All you need is love        love

C/CEG     D/CA    D/CDG
Love is all you need


There's this cool intro:
 
Pick up notes(single notes in r.h. D, then CD)
 
G/BDG, G/BDG
 
D/DF#A, D/DF#A
 
G/GBD, B/BDG, B/BDG, D/DGB, B/BDG
 
C/ACE, D/DF#AC... then play a trill (you know, a rapid moving back 
and forth of two separate notes. At this point in the music, move notes 
A and G back and forth in your right hand. 
 

There's another cool part in the song that has a triplet 
(using three notes in the place for two. It's after the part, 
"All you need is love" and you hear "Everybody". It goes rather quickly 
like this:
 

D/CF#A

D/DF#, E/C#F

Triplet: G/CE, A/CEb and G/BD
 

The outro or ending just repeats and fades away.
 
Looking to play along and having your practice time not 
be boring? Visit,  
 
The Back Pocket Band Video 
 
Enjoy! 






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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