Happy Together



There's a real cool song that was written in the 60's by Garry Bonner and Alan Gordon, called Happy Together. Maybe you remember hearing The Turtles and The Monkees recording it. It has a steady, solid beat and I play it in the Key of G. It's a pretty easy progression.



Music Chords to Happy Together


 Em
Imagine me and you, I do.
 D
I think about you day and night, it's only right.
 C
To think about the girl you love, and hold her tight.
 B
So happy together. 

 Em
If I should call you up, invest a dime.
 D
And you say you belong to me, and ease my mind.
 C
Imagine how the world would be, so very fine.
 B
So happy together. 

Chorus:

 ED (or Bm7)EG
 I can see me loving' nobody but you, for all my life.
 ED (Bm7)EG
 When you're with me baby, the skies will be blue for all my life.

 Em
 Me and you, and you and me.
 D
No matter how the toss the dice, it was to be.
 C
The only one for me is you, and you for me.
 B
So happy together.  

Chorus:

 EDEG
 I can see me loving' nobody but you, for all my life.
 EEEG
 When you're with me baby, the skies will be blue for all my life.


 Em
 Me and you, and you and me.
 D
No matter how the toss the dice, it was to be.
 C
The only one for me is you, and you for me.
 B
So happy together.  

 EADG
                                                                               
Ba-ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba-ba



 EDEG
                                                                               
Ba-ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba-ba




 Em
 Me and you, and you and me.
 D
No matter how the toss the dice, it was to be.
 C
The only one for me is you, and you for me.
 B
So happy together.  

 EmB
 So happy together.
 EmB
 How is the weather?
 EmB
 So happy together. (Repeat and fade)
 EmB
 We're happy together
 EmB
 So happy together
Em B (horns enter)
Happy together
 EmB
 So happy together
 EmB
                                                                              
So happy together (ba-ba-ba-ba  ba-ba-ba-ba)


So, what about looking at a chord chart? I guess the most important thing is to 
know your chords and the inversions. 

Although chord finders are valuable tools on the Internet, what do we do when we're sitting at the piano and don't have access to the computer, trying to figure out chords? Here's a breakdown on forming many chords you can use in your piano playing. Yes, there are augmented chords, and there are 9, 11 and 13 chords. I have chosen a few basic ones to start with.

Major
Minor
Dominant 7th

Sus4

Sus2 and add9

Diminished
Major Sevenths
Major Chords


Starting from the root note, count up FIVE semi-tones (5 half steps). Always use the root note when counting. This will bring you to the second note in the chord. From and including this note, count up FOUR semi-tones (4 half steps). This will bring us to the final note in the chord.

Example: C Major - C is the root note in this chord. Count up 5 semi-tones from the C: C=1, C#= 2, D=3, Eb=4, E=5. Then, count up 4 semi-tones from the second note in the chord: E=1, F=2, F#=3, G=4. Play the C, E and G together and you have a C Major chord. By using this 'FIVE then FOUR' rule, you can work out any major chord.

Minor (m) Chords

For minor chords, simply reverse the rule for working out major chords. Instead of counting 5 then 4, count 4 then 5.

Example: C Minor - C is the root note in this chord. Count up 4 semi-tones from the C: C=1, C#=2, D=3, Eb=4. Then, count up 5 semi-tones from the second note in the chord: Eb=1, E=2, F=3, F#=4, G=5. Play the C, Eb and G together and you have a C Minor chord. By using this FOUR then FIVE rule, you can work out any minor chord.

Dominant 7th (7) Chords

With 7th chords, you add an extra note onto the chord. This extra note is always the note two semi-tones (1 whole step) below the root note. However, you don't play this note at the bottom of the chord, you simply move it to the top of the chord.

Example: C7 - Form a C major chord... C, E, and G. The root note of this chord is C. Two semi-tones (1 whole step) below the root note is Bb. Add this Bb to the top of the chord and we have a C7 chord- C, E, G and Bb. The same rule applies for working out minor 7th chords.

Sus4 Chords

Example: Csus4
Play C major - C, E, G. Move the middle note of the chord UP one semi-tone (1 half-step). In this example, move E up one semi-tone. This brings us to F. Play the C, F and G together and we have a Csus4 chord.
Sus2 and add9 Chords
Sus2 Chords - Example: Csus
Play C major - C, E, G. Move the middle note of the chord DOWN two semi-tones (1 whole step). In this example, move the E down two semi-tones. This brings us to D. Play the C, D and G together and we have a Csus2 chord.

Add9 Chords - These chords are nearly identical to sus2 chords. The only difference is, is that you play the middle note as well. So, Cadd9 is made up of, C, D, E and G.

Diminished (dim) Chords

Example: Cdim
Play C major - C, E and G. Move the TOP TWO NOTES of the chord DOWN one semi-tone (1 half-step). In this example, move the E and G down one semi-tone. This brings us to Eb and F#. Play the C, Eb and F# together and we have a Cdim chord.
Major Seventh (M7) Chords

These chords are used a lot in Jazz music. With major 7th chords, you add an extra note onto the chord. This extra note is always the note ONE semi-tone (1 half-step) below the root note. However, you don't play this note at the bottom of the chord. You simply move it to the top of the chord.

Example: CM7 - Form a C major chord... C, E, and G. The root note of this chord is C. One semi-tone (1 half-step) below the root note is B. Add this B to the top of the chord and we have a CM7 chord... C, E, G and B.

Now you have some music theory to apply to your piano playing. Forming chords will lead to playing chord progressions which will then produce songs.

I highly recommend this music resource, Chords. It's an audio course by Jermaine Griggs and yes, this is an affiliate link. Jermaine is a great teacher and you'll learn about Triads that are based on the Tertian system of harmony. In this system the tones of the triad are related to one another by the interval of the 3rd.

All the best,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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