What Is Bebop?

Jazz vocalist Cassandra Wilson performing at t...
Image via Wikipedia
  "Swing arrangements mainly consisted of composed sections, but with certain sections designated for improvisation. A bebop tune, however,, would simply consist of a statement of the head, or main theme, extended solos over the head’s harmonic structure, and then one final statement of the head. It was common for bebop musicians to compose new, complex melodies over well-known chord progressions. One example of this is Charlie Parker’s “Ornithology,” which is based on the changes from “How High the Moon,” a popular show tune in the 1940s. "

For more description, read about Bebop Musicians 

Here's an overview of a very cool article (focusing on solo development) written by Dr. Stylani Tartsinis. I have learned a lot from it and I think you will, too.

To understand the Bebop approach in music, we have to take a look at chromatics. 
 
 If you're not familiar with Bebop, listen to these Bebop mp3
Bebop patterns are like embellishments to the bare melodic structure. Remember that in jazz, the scale degrees are referred to as numbers rather than letters.

Example #1

C E G Bb
1      3 5 b7

Here’s a diatonic exercise to practice, approaching the target tone by a whole step above and below. When the target tone is approached by a whole step above, it forms a 9th; if approached from below, it forms a flat 7 in the chord.

Example #2

D to C = Whole step above
9-1

Bb to C = Whole step below
b7-1

Extra tones: Dominant 7th (natural 7), Major (#5), Minor (natural 3) and Half-dim (natural 5). Begin the scale on the odd numbers. If the scale is begun on the even beats (2, 4 or 6), the student will have to insert a half-step to prevent these added tones from falling on downbeats.

Example #3 Major

C D  E F G  G# A B C
1  2   3  4  5  #5   6  7

Example #4 Minor

C D Eb E F G A B C
1 2  b3  4  5  6  7

Example  #5 Dominant 7th Scale

C D E F G A Bb B C
1 2  3  4 5  6  b7  7

Example #6 Half Dim Bebop

C  Db Eb   F  Gb G Ab Bb C
1b 2b 3 4b 5n 5b  6  b7

Chromatic Approach Tones

Here are some examples of approaching the target note C (tonic or1). The approach tones are proceeded with a half-step (above or below), but at times, could be approached by a whole step. It is this chromatic sound that defines the bebop style. It is also important to keep in mind that these exercises are strictly for developing the bebop sound. You should further practice these bebop examples to extend these patterns with combinations of other chord tones an scales.

Single Note Approach

C# to C Half-step above

B to C Half-step below

Note: The above and below examples note #1 (C#) as b9 (Db). Note that the #1 (C#) is the enharmonic or the same tone to b9 (Db). B9 is preferred because of its frequent use as an extension.

C# to B to C = Half-step above and below

B to C# to C  = Half-step below and above

Double Note Approach

D to C# to C = Two half-steps above

Bb to B to C  = two half-steps below

Combination of Single and Double Note Approach

C#-Bb-B-C = 1 half-step above & 2 half-steps below
B9-b7-7-1

For more reading on this great article, check out http://www.jazzedmagazine.com/2318/articles/master-class/the-bebop-approach/

Chord Chart to How High The Moon

A7                Dm7                  Dm7  G7
Somewhere there's music, how faint the tune.
                  Cm7                  Cm7    F7
Somewhere there's heaven, how high the moon?
Bb+7        Em-5            A7      Am7       Em7-5
There is no moon above when love is far away, too.
     A7       D9         Em7      A7     Fm7    F7 Em7
Till it comes true, that you love me, as I love you.

#2.
    Em7   A7      Dm7                  Dm7  G7
Somewhere there's music, how near, how far?
                  Cm7                    Cm7 F7
Somewhere there's heaven, it's where you are.
    Bb      Em7-5                A7                   Dm7
The darkest night would shine if you would come to me soon.
A7-9      Fm7       F7       Em         Em7  A7-9  D6
Until you will, how still my heart, how high the   moon???
 

  You'll stay on beat with your solo development if you use the Song Robot Software


 All the best,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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How To Play Sanctuary

11-24-11



In 1982, John W. Thompson and Randy Scruggs wrote a beautiful song called Sanctuary. Are you familiar with it? I've played it many times with different arrangements. The one I am playing here is arranged by carol Tornquist. It has an easy feel in two beats.




The particular setting I'm using on the keyboard gives it that airy sound you here in the background.
Just use your l.h. for the broken chords, mostly an F chord. Now the song starts in the Key of F.

The Intro:

F2
Bb2/F
F2
Eb
C7sus

I love the sounds of the C7sus. You're playing CFBb/C

Chords to Sanctuary

F2
C2/E
Eb
Bb2/D
Bbm/Db
F/C
Gm/C
Am/C
Gm/C
F2
C2/E = EC/DGC
Eb = Eb/BbEbG
Bb2/D = D/CFBb
Bb/D = D/BbFBb
Bb/C
F2
Bb2/F
F2
D9sus = DGC/EAD
D7

* Key Change (Modulate): Key of G

G2
F9,13
C2/E
C/E
Cm/Eb
G/D
Em/C#
Cmaj9 = C/DEGB
Am/D
D7(b9) = D/CEbF#B
G2
Gmaj7 = A/DF#B
E9sus = EAD/F#AE
E7 = E/G#E
Am7 = AG/CEC
D7sus = DG/CD
G2
C2/G
G2
C2/G
F6,9
G
G2

I wanted to take the opportunity to thank each one of you for following LadyDpiano, subscribing to my free monthly newsletter and to those who Like Me on FaceBook! Your kind comments are always appreciated.

Wishing you a very Happy Thanksgiving!

Blessings,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Practical Approach to Ear Training


I want to give a shout out to Richard, Liz, Joshua and Tyrus for asking me about ear training and those who are learning to play by ear with the number system. I was reading a great article in one of my jazz magazines and thought I'd share some great tips with you.

Ear training can be a valuable tool to help students learn effectively. The better your ability to hear, the faster you learn -- and the slower you forget. The ability of the ear to hear is the intuitive, non-intellectual part of music, and it enhances the jazz player's ability to "hear" where the next notes are coming from. 


A few players naturally have excellent ear training -- some educators call it "perfect pitch." People who don't have this natural talent need ear training. Having a good ear means that you can hear the right note before you play it. It doesn't mean when you play a wrong note you then fumble around and find the right note through trial and error.


For people who have a good ear, music is easier for them and more natural to learn. That's not to say  they don't have to practice and work hard to achieve expertise in music. Many of us recognize that perhaps the fastest way to become a skilled musician is to play everything you know, hear and sing in 12 keys. The focus here is to hear and sing melodic shapes and intervals, in as many keys as possible.


Recognizing the shape of an arpeggiated chord eventually makes hearing harmony possible. By thinking of these shapes as chords, one starts to hear harmony as well as melody. The next step is to sing a melody and arpeggiate down, making the sound of the chord. To do this, you have to know what the melody is in relationship to the chord.


When you put away your music and try to play the song without music, do you really know it? If you can't sing the song, you don't really know it. If you don't know what the melody note is in relationship to the chord or the root motion of the harmony, then you don't know the song.


The melody and the harmony have everything to do with each other. If the piano player sees that the melody is a major 7th, he will structure the chord taking into consideration the melody. If the melody has a flat 9, he would not play a natural 9. This relationship of melody and harmony is key in learning a song.


Miles Donahue says, 

"If we were to think of jazz as a car, the engine of improvising would be the mind and ear. The wheels are the mechanical ability to play what you think and hear. The internal combustion - the art - comes from the soul and creative spirit. Most jazz players learn the genre of jazz through listening to the great players who developed this art form."
So, one must work real hard with ear training. Most of us are not pros like Stan Getz, when it comes to ear training. Stan Getz possessed the ear-training equivalent of a photographic memory. Anything he heard, he remembered and could play back. He was able to improvise at a very high level without knowledge of the  theory behind what he was hearing and playing. James Moody and Chet Baker also had such reputations.

I have 2 resources to share with you. 
Add to your music library:

PITCH Ear Training Software

Piano By Ear For Starters


Oh, and do you know someone who plays the violin? Here's a great offer for you.

The Complete Violin Package is coming soon! at Virtual Sheet Music ®

All the best,





"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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From A Distance: Bette Midler

Photo of Bette Midler backstage at the Grammy ...Image via Wikipedia I have always liked the song, From A Distance.

"Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress, and comedian, also known by her informal stage name, The Divine Miss M. She has starred in highly acclaimed films, such as The Rose, Ruthless People, Beaches, and For The Boys. During her more than forty-year career, Midler has been nominated for two Academy Awards, and won four Grammy Awards, four Golden Globes, three Emmy Awards, and a special Tony Award. She has sold over 30 million albums worldwide."
http://en.wikipedia.org





From A Distance - Bette Midler (Piano)




An interval in music is the distance in pitch between two notes. The interval is counted from the lower note to the higher one, with the lower counted as 1. Intervals can be named generally by merely counting upwards (by going forwards using the letters of the musical alphabet) from one note to the other, inclusively. For example, from C to E is a third (C to C is 1, or more commonly and elegantly, a unison, C to D is a second and finally, c to E is a third.)
Intervals are named by the number of the upper note (2nds, 3rds, etc. ) but there are two exceptions to this. The interval between notes that are identical is called UNISON (also called a PRIME INTERVAL); the interval of an 8th is called an OCTAVE.

Melodic and Harmonic Intervals

Intervals are called Melodic Intervals when they are sounded separately and Harmonic Intervals when they are sounded together. When studying chords we talk about harmonic intervals. When melodies are played, we study melodic intervals.

Mary Had a Little Lamb = E-D-C-D-E-E-E is a melodic interval.
C Major Chord = C + E + G played together is a harmonic interval.
3rd and 5th intervals make up the major chord. A lowered 3rd interval (minor interval) and 5th interval make up the minor chord.

Perfect and Major Intervals 

The interval between the keynote of a major scale and the unison, 4th, 5th, or octave of that scale is called a Perfect Interval.
For example, the difference from C to G (in a C major scale) is called a Perfect 5th. The difference from C to F is called a Perfect 4th. The 8th note of the scale is referred to as the Perfect Octave. The difference between the same note is called the Perfect Unison.
The interval between the keynote of a major scale and the 2nd, 3rd, 6th or 7th of that scale is called a Major Interval.
For example, the difference from c to c (in a C major scale) is called a Major 2nd. The difference from C to E is called a Major 3rd. The difference from C to A is called a Major 6th and the difference from C to B is called a Major 7th.

Minor Types

When the interval between two notes of a major interval (2nd, 3rd, 6th or 7th) is decreased by a half step, they become Minor Intervals.
For example, a major 3rd becomes a minor third when decreased by a half step. In a C major scale, the major third interval is from C to E. Changing the major third to a minor third would simply mean lowering the E to E flat. A minor 2nd would be D flat instead of D. A minor 6th would be A flat instead of A. The minor 7th interval would include B flat instead of B.
Only Major intervals may be made into minor intervals. Perfect intervals may not (for example, a minor perfect does not exist).

Augmented and Diminished Types

The word augmented means "made larger." When a perfect or major interval is made larger by a half step, it becomes an Augmented Interval. For example, a perfect 5th can become an augmented 5th by raising the 5th one half step.
In a C major scale, the perfect 5th is the interval from C to G. By simply raising G to G#, the interval has been expanded, which makes it an Augmented 5th.

The word diminished means "made smaller." When a perfect or minor interval is made smaller by a half step, it becomes a Diminished Interval. For example, a perfect 4th can become a diminished 4th by lowering the 4th a half step.
In the C Major scale, G is the perfect 5th. By simply lowering G to Gb, it has been made the diminished 5th.

Chromatic Types 

When the keynote and the upper note of an interval are not from the same major scale, it is called a Chromatic Interval. Minor, diminished and augmented intervals are always chromatic intervals in major keys.

Summary:
What is an interval? 

Unison (Prime Interval) and Octave
Melodic/Harmonic Int
Perfect Unison, 4th, 5th and Perfect Octave
Major 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th
Minor Int
Augmented and Diminished Int
Chromatic Int
Now we have laid some groundwork for you to understand chords.

Chord Chart

G G G C A x2                    

            G         C            D      Em             C          D           G  
From a distance the world looks blue and green and the snow-capped mountains white.  
           G        C     D        Em               C     D         G   
From a distance the ocean meets the stream and the eagle takes to flight.  
        C         D        Em             C       G           D     D7   
From a distance there is harmony and it echoes through the land.  
         C          G             C         G             C        D      G   
It's the voice of hope it's the voice of peace it's the voice of every man.  

  
From a distance we all have enough and no one is in need.                        
And there are no guns no bombs and no disease no hungry mouths to feed.               
From a distance we are instruments marching in a common band.                                    
Playing songs of hope playing songs of peace - they're the songs of every man.  


         C      D           G      Em           C        D              G   
God is watching us. God is watching us. God is watching us     from a distance.  


             
From a distance you look like my friend even though we are at war.  
From a distance I just cannot comprehend what all this fighting is for.  
From a distance there is harmony and it echoes through the land.   
And it's the hope of hopes it's the love of loves it's the heart of every man.  
It's the hope of hopes it's the love of loves - This is the song of every man.  


And God is watching us God is watching us God is watching us from a distance.  
      
Oh God is watching us God is watching. God is watching us from a distance. 
 
++++++++
 

 
FROM A DISTANCE was written in 1987. 
Here's what I'm playing.
        G2            C2/G           D/G         G2
From a distance the world looks blue and green,
         C           D         G     ( D/G,C2/G)
and the snow-capped mountains white.
        G2           C2   C/E   D/F#  G
From a distance the ocean meets the stream,
 G/B        C     D    G D/G
and the eagle takes to flight.

REFRAIN 1
        Cmaj7       D        Em
From a distance, there is harmony,
        C        G/B   G/D   D
and it echoes through the land.
           C       G/B             C       G/B
It's the voice of hope, it's the voice of peace,
          C        D     G,    C 
it's the voice of every man.

       G          C      D    G
From a distance we all have enough,
     C     D      G      C
and no one is in need.
                                                                                          
G          C           D     Em                   
And there are no guns, no bombs, and no disease,
C          D          G
no hungry mouths to feed.

REFRAIN 2
        C        D         Em
From a distance we are instruments
         C    G        D
marching in a common band.
         C        G               C      G
Playing songs of hope, playing songs of peace.
             C       D     G
They're the songs of every man.

          C      D          G       Em
God is watching us. God is watching us.
        C               D    G
God is watching us from a distance.


      G         C        D          G
From a distance you look like my friend,
       C      D        G        C
even though we are at war.
        G       C             D     Em
From a distance I just cannot comprehend
C               D           G,    C(pause)
  what all this fighting is for.

        G        D       Em
From a distance there is harmony,
       C         G          D
and it echoes through the land.
             C         G               
And it's the hope of hopes, 
          C        G
it's the love of loves,
          C          D  Em
it's the heart of every man.
         C        G              C        G
It's the hope of hopes, it's the love of loves.
            C       D      G
This is the song of every man.
           G/C  C6  D          D7/G G   D/F# Em
And God is watching us, God is watching us,
 Em7      Am7       C/D    D           G G/B
God is watching us      from a distance.
           G/C  C6   D          D7/G   G D/F# Em Em7
Oh, God is watching us, God is watching.
       Am7        C/D       G2
God is watching us from a distance.

                   
Chord Breakdown
 
G2 = GD/ABD
 
C2/G = GE/CDF#
 
D/G = GF#/AD
 
C = CG/EGD
 
D = DA/F#AD
 
G = GD/GBG
 
C/E = EC/GD
 
D/F# = F#D/AD
 
Cmaj7 = CG/EGB
 
Em = EB/EGB
 
G/B = B/GBD
 
G/C = C/DGB
 
C6 = C/CEA
 
D7/G = G/CDA
 
Am7 = AG/BD
 
G2 = GD/ABDG 
 
         
                  


Become A Better Church Pianist Now!
Learn How To Play Hymns Using Color Chords
& Exciting Runs & Fillers

www.PianoArrangement.com






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Color My World: Chicago

Color My World: Chicago


You know, I mostly post Gospel and Blues songs on this site, LadyDpiano.com Plus, you'll find piano tips here to improve your playing. Did I mention a free monthly newsletter?
You'll want to sign up for that, too! But I wanted to ask...


Have you gone over to the other blog? That's where you'll find Jazz posts. http://pianodiana.blogspot.com I thought I'd share one of my favorite songs with you. I'm playing on the Yamaha Motif ES8 on a Vintage setting. Do you have a favorite song by Chicago?

Color My World-Chicago (Piano Cover)

I love this song. It was a seventies smash hit! It was written by James Pankow and recorded by the group Chicago.

James Carter "Jimmy" Pankow (born August 20, 1947) is an American trombone player, songwriter and brass instrument arranger best known as a founding member of the rock band Chicago.
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Pankow
 
COLOR MY WORLD

F
AS TIME GOES ON

Am
I REALIZE JUST WHAT YOU

Bb               Eb
MEAN TO ME

        Ab
AND NOW NOW THAT YOU'RE NEAR

Gb                          D7
PROMISE YOUR LOVE

                               G
THAT I'VE WAITED TO SHARE

          Eb7                           C7
AND DREAM  OF OUR MOMENTS TOGETHER

                                          F
Bb       C7 F
COLOR MY WORLD WITH HOPES OF LOVING YOU
Cowboy Lyrics.com


Here's what I play:


Fmaj7
AS TIME GOES ON

Am
I REALIZE JUST WHAT YOU

Bb      Ebmaj9
MEAN TO ME

        Abmaj7          Gbmaj7

AND NOW NOW THAT YOU'RE NEAR

D9                         D7
PROMISE YOUR LOVE

                         Gm7
THAT I'VE WAITED TO SHARE

          Eb9              C7
AND DREAM  OF OUR MOMENTS TOGETHER

                                    
Bb       C7         Fm7  Bb  C7     Fmaj7
COLOR MY WORLD WITH HOPES OF LOVING YOU
 
 
 Chord Breakdown to Colour My World:

Fmaj7 = F/AEF

Am = A/CEA

Bb = Bb/BbDF

Ebmaj9 = Eb/BbDF

Abmaj7 = Ab/CEbG

Gbmaj7 = Gb/BbDbF

D9 = D/CEF#A

Gm7 = G/BDF#

Eb9 = Eb/BbDbFG

C7 = C/EBbC

If you like the sound of Jazz and have always wanted to learn how to play tons of jazz chord patterns and want a signature sounding solo of your own, order this beginner Jazz Dvd, Jazz 101





"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Four Tips on Playing Scales

Piano Scale Fingering


I wrote an article on Four Tips To Playing Scales.

Maybe you feel this way. You see, one of my piano students was practicing a difficult scale. She was missing a certain key or playing the wrong one every single time.

To fix this, she decided to put a piece of sticky note on the key that she was missing. This helped her hand learn the pattern of the scale.

When you're playing a musical phrase, you should end with a soft note for a gentle, rounded ending. Sometimes a note is played with the first finger (the thumb). The problem is that the thumb strikes the key sideways and may come down with a heavy touch. You have to be careful to set it down gently  and still play a soft note. You don't have to do anything special to avoid a clunky thumb - just think about it and have your ears tuned to the delicate sound you want to hear at the end of a line.

Thumb Under


Here's My Article:

Playing scales is a good thing for developing technique. I am not saying that one should sit down at the piano and practice scales and exercises for hours to obtain results. That would be so boring but if you look at these points, you will acquire a great technique in just a few weeks.

1. Scales train the fingers so that they do their work evenly and smoothly.

Playing scales is a good thing for developing technique. I am not saying that one should sit down at the piano and practice scales and exercises for hours to obtain results. If you look at these points, you will acquire a great technique in just a few weeks. Scales train the fingers so that they do their work evenly and smoothly.
Every tone of a scale must be played with effort, energy and enthusiasm. The ear that is listening carefully is trained to hear the exact volume of sound. Having an accurate knowledge of the notes in the scale and using the correct fingering, that is, the use of the thumbs and the third and fourth fingers, will help you play it from memory.

2. When playing scales, each hand will practice alone.

What happens is that if you don't take the time to practice the hands separately then the right hand will drown out the left hand (or vice versa). Pay attention to the rhythm of playing a scale. Start with the C major scale. Later on with time and much practice, learn the variations of sixths, thirds, and contrary motions.

3. The tones of the scale must be played with equality of strength.

When using the thumb, there must be extra pressure and with the second and third fingers there will be a certain amount of restraint but then you will continue with your fourth and fifth fingers with added strength as you press down the keys.
It seems that most folks have trouble with their thumb in playing scales. Often the thumb strikes the keys too faintly, so you'll want to strike the key from above in a downward move. Practice five tones ascending and descending very slowly at first. Most importantly, pay careful attention to the rhythm and touch of every tone while bending the thumb and going under the third finger.

4. Be attentive to the movement of your muscles.

A great difficulty when playing scales is the passing over and under of the fingers. You will want to roll the lower arm by a side movement of your hand over the keyboard. It's easy to do but it will be difficult to do when your hand is bent sideways.

You should feel very relaxed when playing scales. Your piano playing will become smooth and rippling. When both hands are combined, you'll be hearing the tones of the two hands more equally.
If you review these points, keeping watch over both your hands and practice scales a short time every day, in a few weeks you will acquire a great technique to help you play scales in a much better way.



  • Supercharge Your Hand Eye Coordination

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Also, Hear and Play offers a course on finger exercises, called Hanon Exercises

All the best,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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Breathe Recorded by Rebecca St. James

This is the air I breathe.


I just love this time of year and all the beauty that 
surrounds me. How is it where you are?

I want to thank you for all of your emails. I receive 
so many comments from wonderful musicians who want
to play for their church.

I hope to upload more videos and do more posts on music theory in the days and weeks ahead. Everyone wants to know 
how to make both hands work on the piano. You've got to 
keep practicing scales and exercises, separately and then 
together. Plus, knowing your chords helps and especially how
to read chord charts/slash chords.


I like this song, Breathe. I play it in the Key of G.
Here's a few charts and then you can see what I play
below, along with the name of the notes.





BREATHE

tempo = 77 BPM
time = 4/4


Verse

A2  |  D2/F#  |  A2  |  D2/F#  |

A2  /  E2/G#  /  |  F#m7s  /  E  /  |

D2  /  /  D2/F#  |  E  /  Es  E  :||



Chorus

A2  /  E2/G#  /  |  F#m7s  /  E  /  |

D2  /  /  D2/F#  |  E  /  Es  E  :||



End

D2  /  /  A2  |  E  :||
 Guitar Chords

* * * * * * *

GC
This is the air I breathe
GC
This is the air I breathe
GDEmD
Your holy presence
CEmD
Livingin me

GC
This is my daily bread
GC
This is my daily bread
GDEmD
Your very word
CEmD
Spoken to me

GDEmDCEmD
And I, I'm desperate for You
GDEmDCEmD
And I, I'mlost without You

GC
This is the air I breathe
GCG
This is the air I breathe
 http://www.chordie.com/

+++++++++++

Breath Recorded by Rebecca St. James


G                  Gsus
This is the air I breathe 
G                  Gsus
This is the air I breathe 
G       D/F#   Em7  D
Your holy presence 
C2(no3)        G/B   D  Dsus  D  Dsus
Living in me 

G                  Gsus
This is my daily bread 
G                  Gsus
This is my daily bread 
G       D/F#  Em7  D
Your very word 
C2(no3)  G/B         D
Spoken to me 

     G   D/G  G  D/G         C Em D 
And I, I'm desperate for You 
Dsus    G    D/G  G  D/G C    Em D
And I, I'm lost without You

Piano Chords:

G = G/BDG

Gsus = G/CDG

D/F# = F#/DF#A

Em7 = E/BDG

D = D/ADF#

C2(no3) = C/CDG

Dsus = D/ADG

 Stop by and see this amazing software, Instant Transposer Software

Best,






"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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