How To Play Color Chords



To get a really full sound in your right hand, try putting in not only the notes of the chord under the melody, but also try to incorporate a color tone of some kind, such as a 6th, 7th, major 7th, or 9th. You can overdo it, of course, but this short video demonstrates how it is done.

Use thirds, sixths and full chords to your melody. Major 7th and  Major 9th's are called color chords, adding motion to your sound. This is one of the best instructional videos I have found online by Duane.


Piano Lesson on YouTube

To identify interval sounds in a song, I think I have found another great tool 
for you, Interval Song Examples Chart

Here's an example of descending Major 6th in the left hand. 

Intro Chords:  E  E   E   E

Verse 1
A                      D
Where it began I can’t begin to know it
A                                  E
But then I know it’s going strong
A                       D
Was in the spring, and spring became a summer
A                                               E
Who’d have believe you’d come along

Chorus
A         Amaj7
Hands         touching hands
E                       D                           E
Reaching out touching me  touching you

A               D                                E
Sweet Caroline  Good times never seemed so good
A            D                                  E
Im inclined to believe there never would
D   C#m  Bm
But now I’m

Verse 2
Look at the night and it don’t seem so lonely
We fill it up with only two
And when I hurt Hurting runs off my shoulder
How can I hurt when holding you

Warm touching warm
Reachin out touching me touching you

Chorus
A         Amaj7
Hands         touching hands
E                       D                           E
Reaching out touching me  touching you

A               D                                               E
Sweet Caroline  Good times never seemed so good
A            D                                  E
Im inclined to believe there never would
D   C#m  Bm
Oh no no

Intro Chords

Chorus
Understanding the Power of Intervals in Jazz Music
 
By now, you probably already know what whole 
and half steps are.
To review:
Half Step (h) - From key to key (no keys in between).
Whole step (w) - Every other key (one key in between).
Here are some things to keep in mind:
2 Half Steps = 1 Whole step
2 Whole Steps = 4 Half Steps
1 Half Step = 1/2 Whole Step
Examples:
C to E = 2 whole steps or 4 half steps
F to F# = 1 half step
G to C = 5 half steps
Intervals 
Intervals are important. They form major, minor and 
other types of chords. Do you know what an interval is?
An interval in music, is the distance in pitch between 
two notes. (major, perfect, melodic, harmonic, minor, 
augmented, diminished, etc.)

Major Third:
Is the distance between the root and the (3) degree 
of a major scale.
For example, in C Major, the root is (C) and the (3) 
degree is E.
C and E played together is classified as a major third.
This is the beginning of a major chord.
Perfect Fifth:
Is the distance between the root and the (5) degree of 
a major scale.
For example, in C Major, the root is (C) and the 5th 
degree is (G).
C and G played together is classified as a 
'perfect fifth'.
As you will learn, these two intervals combine to make 
up the major chord.
Try to figure out the major third and perfect fifth 
intervals in all 12 keys.
If you want to learn more on intervals, order Jermaine Grigg's 
300 Page Course Book

"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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