Reharmonizing V as II-V


Let's continue with reharmonization.



Reharmonizing V as II-V

Many of the standard tunes in the jazz repertoire were written in the 1920s and 1930s. Those tunes consist largely of V-I progressions. II-V and II-V-I progressions were used only by the more sophisticated songwriters of that time. One of the first reharmonization techniques used by the jazz musicians of the 1930s was to proceed a V chord with its II chord to create a II-V progression. Reharmonizing V as II-V  makes a tune sound more modern, and expands the improvisational possibilities.

Here's 2 examples of 2 measures from the song "I Remember You", written by Victor Schertzinger. The V chord (E7) has been proceeded by a II chord (B-7).

F/ AE
E/ G#DE 

Then Play:
F/AE
B/ADE
E/G# 


Tritone Substitution



Reharmonizing can mean replacing one chord with another, or using a substitute chord. A substitute chord is just what it sounds like: a chord that substitutes for the chord written on the lead sheet.

Here's four bars of "All The Things You Are" by Jerome Kern. I"ll substitute the A7 for Eb7. 

F/EbAb
Bb/AbDb
Eb/DbG
Ab/CG


Then Play:


F/EbAb
Bb/AbDb
A/C#G
Ab/CG


Now Try This:


F/EbAb
Bb/AbDb
E/DG
A/C#G
Ab/CG


Listen for the chord progression and tell me, does  it sounds smoother? More modern? Do you like it? This is the sound of tritone substitution.

Jermaine Griggs has a very nice theory course book that I refer back to many times. He has a section on altering chords that is very good. For more information, visit Playing Altered Chords By Ear.

Here's the II-V-I in the Key of C.

D/CF
G/BF
C/BE


Then hear how the Db7 for G7 creates a chromatic bass line: D, Db, C.


D/CF
Db/CbF
C/BE


Here's how tritone substitution works: As you have learned before, the two most important notes in major, minor, and dominant 7th chords are the 3rd and the 7th. These notes determine the quality of, or differences between those chords. 

Let's review some rules: 


1. A major 7th chord has a major 3rd and a major 7th.
2. A minor 7th chord has a minor 3rd and a minor 7th.
3. A dominant 7th chord has a major 3rd and a minor 7th


Tritone Substitutions


You may be interested in Jamal Hartwell's Tritone Xtravganza Dvd, especially if you like tritone sounds and are an intermediate-advanced player. For more information, visit Tritone


Advanced players, take a look at this advanced reharmonization technique chord chart and video of Thelonius Monk Round Midnight

Here's another great site for reharm practice with midis:
Mallet Jazz
 
Next time, I'll list various combinations of altered chords.

Until then,
-- LadyD


"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you." B.B.King
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